Buy 5.56 Tracer Rounds | At Best Price

$30.00

Made in USA

Rounds; 20 Rounds

Boxes Left: 22 Boxes

Category: Product ID: 4435

Description

5.56 tracer rounds

5.56 tracer rounds picture

PRODUCT OVERVIEW ON 5.56 TRACER ROUNDS:

This 5.56 tracer rounds Federal American Eagle Ammunition is genuine Lake City Ammunition Plant overrun ammunition

. This 5.56 tracer rounds ammunition is loaded to military specification and is perfect for providing the shooter with

immediate feedback through trajectory visualization by allowing the bullet path to be seen.

5.56 Tracer rounds ammunition is a great choice for banging away at steel targets, casual plinking and high-volume blasting sessions.

If you’re a gun enthusiast interested in shooting tracer rounds, you’ve likely heard of 5.56 tracer rounds.

These rounds are a type of ammunition that is used in a wide range of firearms, from AR-15s to M16s.

Not only do they provide a great visual display, but they can also help you improve your accuracy in target shooting.

In this blog post, we’ll discuss the benefits of 5.56 tracer rounds, how they work, and safety considerations when using them.

Keep reading to learn more about this fascinating type of ammunition and

the exciting possibilities it opens up for the avid shooter.

The military uses tracer ammunition as an efficient tool for signaling.

They are effective for use as pre-arranged signals between units and individuals; they also can be used to designate targets.

As tracers burn very bright and very hot they may catch surrounding vegetation on fire,

so they should only be used where there is a limited chance of the shooter starting a fire.

This ammunition is loaded with a delayed ignition tracer meaning it will not ignite for 50-100 yards.

This means the tracer is not burning up barrels prematurely causing damage to expensive firearms.

This ammunition is new production, non-corrosive, in boxer-primed, reloadable Lake City brass cases.

5.56 tracer rounds picture

Federal American Eagle Ammunition standard tracer cartridge equivalent to M856 and L110, with full luminosity trace up to 600 m from the muzzle,

visible in both day and night. Suitable for 5.56x45mm weapons with a 1:7 to 1:9 barrel twist.

May also be offered linked with any other trajectory-matched cartridges, such as Ball and/or SAT versions, in different configurations.

5.56 tracer rounds It ignites 75 yards out of the muzzle and traces with a Bright Day Light Trace. It will trace 500 yards.

It will not harm your barrel. Sold in 6 Round Packs.

SPECIFICATIONS ON 1000 ROUNDS 5.56 TRACER rounds:

– Caliber: 5.56x45mm NATO
– Bullet Weight: 64 Grains
– Bullet Style: Orange Tipped XM856 FMJ Tracer
– Case Type: Brass
– Quantity: Per 20

Ballistics Information:

– Muzzle Velocity: 3020 fps
– Muzzle Energy: 1255 ft lbs

The History of  5.56 Tracer rounds

Prior to the introduction of tracer rounds, machine gunners and troops relied on visually seeing their

ammunition impact the ground or near the target.

They could then adjust their aim accordingly.

As the effective distance of weapons and bullets increased, the need to adjust aiming quickly without waiting on the impact became vital for success.

The 5.56 tracer ammo is a highly effective and popular choice among gun owners who want to improve

their accuracy and enhance the performance of their firearms.

This type of ammunition offers a number of benefits, including increased accuracy and improved range.

It is especially useful for target shooting, hunting, and self defense purposes. In this blog post,

we will discuss the advantages of 5.56 tacer ammo and provide tips on how to choose the right type for your needs.

The first iterations of tracers were developed in the early 20th century and were designed as “spotlight”

bullets that flashed or created a puff of smoke on impact. However, the two major downsides of this design were

that it proved useless when firing into the air at aircraft. It also violated the Hague Convention, which prohibit “exploding bullets.”

The next development involved a bullet with a smoke tail but that ultimately proved ineffective because the mass was

lost in order to provide an effective smoke tail and the accuracy and power diminished.

The UK was the first developed the contemporary tracer round design in 1915. The United States followed shortly after in 1917.

There are three types of modern tracers shooters use today. They include:

  • Bright — These tracers burn immediately when fired, after leaving the muzzle of the weapon.
  • The disadvantage to these tracers is that it gives away the shooters position.
  • Subdued — These tracers begin to burn at full brightness usually after traveling at least one hundred yards in order to help protect the shooters’ position.
  • Dim — Just as the name indicates, these types of tracers burn dimly but can easily be picked up by night vision optics.

Aside from military use, shooters often use tracers for recreation purposes and some types of hunting.

How far do 5.56 tracer rounds go?

The M856 tracer cartridge (63.7-grain bullet) is used in the M16A2/3/4, M4-series, and M249 weapons (among other 5.56mm NATO weapons).
This round is designed to trace out to 875 yards and has an orange tip color, and is trajectory matched to the M855 (62-grain, green tip) ball cartridge.

What is a 5.56 tracer rounds?

It combines superior hard target penetration with better terminal effects than conventional 5.56 NATO Ball version.
Loaded with a lead-free projectile, the 5.56 SAT provides more lethality at close-and-long-range engagements, up to 600 meters.
5.56 tracer bullets have become an increasingly popular choice for shooting enthusiasts in recent years.
The ability for shooters to visually track their shots and make minor adjustments in real-time
can be extremely useful in improving their aim.
In this blog post, we’ll explore the history of 5.56 tracer bullets, their benefits, and how they
can be used to improve your shooting accuracy. So, join us as we take an in-depth look at 5.56 tracer bullets and their advantages!

Are 5.56 tracer rounds stronger?

They have a slight (or not so slight, depending on caliber) incendiary effect. So they can be more effective than regular ball rounds.

What color is 5.56 tracer rounds ammo?

Piney Mountain 22LR Tracer Ammunition – 5 Colors Available (Red, Green, Orange, Pink and White)
These non-corrosive high velocity 22 Long Rifle tracers produce an IMMEDIATE and BRIGHT red,
green or white trace that can be seen for over 150 yards in darkness or daylight.

Are 5.56 Tracer Rounds Legal?

For most of us, tracer rounds likely aren’t worth the hassle associated with them.

Most people don’t realize that tracer rounds are regulated as “explosive materials”

under federal law, and that the ATF has many special rules related to the purchase, sale, storage, and transportation of tracer

rounds (including the requirement that both the buyer and seller of tracer rounds hold a federal explosives license or permit).

This means you’re going to have to jump through a bunch of legal hoops and specialized record keeping in order to legally buy or sell them.

On top of the federal requirements, many individual states and municipal governments have other laws that pertain to tracer ammo too.

So, what we’re basically saying is, “yeah, they are legal under certain conditions but if you’re getting your legal advice from an online blog like this,

you probably don’t want to mess with them.”

Of course, even if you do have the legal ability to own tracers —

Whether or not gun ranges allow them or hunting regulations ban them will vary case by case too.

Typically, there are strict restrictions on tracer rounds due to increased fire danger.

So, you might have tracers that you don’t have any place to fire them. What’s the point in that?

For all your ammunition needs from self-defense to competition rounds and everything in between, we have just what you need.

We carry top brands like Remington, Hornady, Winchester, Federal, and many more, in various calibers to fill your ammunition needs.

what is 5.56 tracer rounds

Some war movies and even news channel clips of active warzones will show gunfire that lights up in the night

. At a glance, it may look like lasers being fired. It’s like something from the Star Wars or Star Trek sagas.

The bright “bullets” are called tracer rounds. Even though they look hi-tech or even sci-fi,

the technology behind tracer rounds is not revolutionary. However, the benefit of their use can be extraordinary.

When it comes to the military, tracers provide a distinct advantage for those who utilize them with regards to aiming and positioning.

What Are 5.56 Tracer Rounds?

To start, let’s answer the question of what are tracer rounds.

5.56 Tracer rounds are a special type of bullet with a small pyrotechnic charge or other luminescent material at the base.

When fired, the powder material ignites and burns very brightly.

The bullet leaves a trail you can see without the aid of weapon optics and especially at night.

The hollow base of the bullet typically contains a small amount of organic fuel, finely ground metallic fuel, and oxidizer.

The oxidizer can include various components to achieve the desired color.

Another common question that comes up is, “How do tracer rounds work?”

When you fire a tracer, the metallic fuel (usually magnesium) ignites and burns the oxidizer (typically a strontium mixture.)

The result is a bright, short flash of white light.

The organic fuel is added chlorine to reduce the heat of the reaction from the metallic fuel and oxidizer.

This ensures the white light doesn’t overpower the desired color of the tracer.

The organic fuel also helps prolong the reaction, which allows the bullet to travel a much farther distance while giving off light.

can you buy tracer rounds

The History of 5.56 Tracer rounds

Prior to the introduction of tracer rounds,

machine gunners and troops relied on visually seeing their ammunition impact the ground or near the target.

They could then adjust their aim accordingly.

As the effective distance of weapons and bullets increased, the need to adjust aiming quickly without waiting on the impact became vital for success.

The first iterations of tracers were developed in the early 20th century and were designed

as “spotlight” bullets that flashed or created a puff of smoke on impact.

However, the two major downsides of this design were that it proved useless when firing into the air at aircraft.

It also violated the Hague Convention, which prohibit “exploding bullets.”

The next development involved a bullet with a smoke tail but that ultimately proved ineffective because

the mass was lost in order to provide an effective smoke tail and the accuracy and power diminished.

The UK was the first developed the contemporary tracer round design in 1915. The United States followed shortly after in 1917.

There are three types of modern tracers shooters use today. They include:

  • Bright — These tracers burn immediately when fired, after leaving the muzzle of the weapon.
  • The disadvantage to these tracers is that it gives away the shooters position.
  • Subdued — These tracers begin to burn at full brightness usually after traveling at least one hundred yards in order to help protect the shooters’ position.
  • Dim — Just as the name indicates, these types of tracers burn dimly but can easily be picked up by night vision optics.

Aside from military use, shooters often use tracers for recreation purposes and some types of hunting.

For most of us, tracer rounds likely aren’t worth the hassle associated with them.

Most people don’t realize that tracer rounds are regulated as “explosive materials” under federal law,

and that the ATF has many special rules related to the purchase, sale, storage,

and transportation of tracer rounds (including the requirement that both the buyer and seller of tracer rounds hold a federal explosives license or permit).

This means you’re going to have to jump through a bunch of legal hoops and

specialized record keeping in order to legally buy or sell them.

On top of the federal requirements, many individual states and municipal governments have

other laws that pertain to tracer ammo too. So, what we’re basically saying is,

“yeah, they are legal under certain conditions but if you’re getting your legal advice from an online blog like this,

you probably don’t want to mess with them.”

Of course, even if you do have the legal ability to own tracers

— Whether or not gun ranges allow them or hunting regulations ban them will vary case by case too.

Typically, there are strict restrictions on tracer rounds due to increased fire danger.

So, you might have tracers that you don’t have any place to fire them. What’s the point in that?

For all your ammunition needs from self-defense to competition rounds and everything in between, we have just what you need.

We carry top brands like Remington, Hornady, Winchester, Federal, and many more, in various calibers to fill your ammunition needs.

Are 5.56 Tracer Rounds Legal

 

White, orange, red, yellow, in addition to green were all common colors used by the different branches of the German army during World War 2.

Thus, you could have a rainbow of colors that illuminates the sky when German units open fire.

However, tracer projectiles were mainly used in aircraft, anti-aircraft guns or warships.

Before the development of tracers, shooters relied on the sight of their bullet holes to adjust their target.

However, these were not always visible, especially since the effective range of ammunition increased

dramatically in the second half of the 19th century, meaning that bullets could strike a kilometer or more when fired from a distance.

In the early 20th century, munitions developers developed “spotlight” bullets that created a lightning bolt or smoke wave on impact to increase their visibility.

However, these projectiles were considered a violation of the hague conventions` ban on “explosive bullets”.

[1] This strategy was also useless when shooting at planes,

as there was nothing that projectiles could strike if they missed the target.

The designers also developed bullets that would follow the white smoke.

However, these designs required excessive mass loss to create a satisfactory track.

The loss of mass on the way to the target had a strong effect on the ballistics of the bullet.

Tracer residues can also cause malfunctions in gasoline firearms. In most shooting ranges,

you cannot shoot the tracers due to the risk of fire. On July 2, 2018, the Lake Christine fire near Basalt,

Colorado, was started by traces of light fired from a shooting range. Two people were charged with 4th degree arson.

[14] The Tracer bullet was invented by the British Army so that they could see where the machine gun fire was,

so they could line up their shots so that they could be more accurate, meaning they were more effective.

Aside from obtaining an explosives license through the ATF,

we don`t have to worry about a highway fireworks display because of the significant regulation of these shells.

and I think that`s good. The M856 tracer cartridge (63.7 grain projectile) is used in the M16A2/3/4,

M4 and M249 weapons (among other NATO 5.56 mm weapons).

This cartridge is designed to be traced up to 875 yards,

and has an orange tip color and matches the M855 bullet cartridge (62 grains, green tip).

The M856 plotter should only be used in the M16A1 in emergency conditions and only in relatively hot weather,

as the slower 1:12 rotation of the M16A1 is not enough to properly stabilize

this projectile at colder combat temperatures (freezing at -40 degrees),

when the air density is much greater and interferes with the gyroscopic stability of the projectile.

The M16A2 and newer models have a rifle rotation of 1 by 7″, which is necessary to stabilize the round M856 plotter in all temperature conditions. (However, the M196 works safely in all 1:7 rotations as well as those with 1:12 rotations.)

Tracers proved to be a countermeasure against the zeppelins used by Germany during World War I.

Airships were used for reconnaissance, surveillance and bombing raids. Normal bullets only caused a slow leak,

but tracers could ignite the hydrogen gas bags and quickly crush the airship.

A tracer projectile does not contain the incandescent/burning part in the tip as some think. Instead,

the projectile contains the torch material in the base, usually a strontium-magnesium compound,

as present in the 5.56 mm M856 tracer projectile, which produces the characteristic red glow.

There is also a delay element in most modern tracer munitions that causes ignition at

a certain distance beyond the operator so as not to reveal its position. As The Pirate League says –

“Trackers work both ways.” By the way, a distinctive feature on M856 ammunition is the orange tip.

Older M196 tracer ammunition is identified by a red tip and usually ignites directly from the gun.

They are color-coded according to the type of ammunition. -green tips (only on 5.56) are standard “ball” ammunition.

-orange tips are tracers. -the black tips are perforating.

Whether you`ve recently purchased your first AR platform rifle or have been shooting for a while,

chances are you`ve probably heard the phrase “green-tipped ammunition.”

This popular 5.56 cartridge is sometimes called a

“Penetrator cartridge” because it has a 62-grain projectile, a partial steel core and .

Purple balls actually exist.
They are called PC balls.

They have a polymer coating instead of brass or copper.

This basically means that the actual projectile is a lead core surrounded by a polymer coating in a case.

Supposedly, these are more accurate and cleaner rounds.

Tracer ammunition is bullets or cannon-caliber projectiles that are built with a small pyrotechnic charge in their base.

The trackers are also sometimes placed two or three cartridges from the bottom of the magazines to alert shooters that their weapons are almost empty.

Every fifth shot in a belt of machine gun projectiles is usually a tracer that gives soldiers an

idea of where their shots are going. Military officials reported this week that they are making progress on

a tracing cycle that can only be seen by those who shoot it and not by those who receive it.

Since tracing cartridges are flammable, the federal government

is not enthusiastic about making them available to the general public as a shooting aid (shock).

In fact, federal authorities have placed the tracer bullets firmly in the category of “explosive materials,”

and so the ATF restricts all aspects of ownership, including their purchase, sale, storage,

and transportation (again a shock). Choosing a particular type of tracer bullet is an important consideration

and this is also the reason why many soldiers generally do not like to use tracer bullets.

Another point to consider when firing tracer projectiles is the environment in which you operate.

For example, a barren desert without trees doesn`t cry out for “fire danger,”

while terrain like California`s hills and forests can`t stop catching fire.

If you`ve ever seen a military movie, you`ll have seen bright bands of color cut in the darkness of a night-time exchange of fire.

These rounds are called “tracer rounds” or “tracer balls”.

In this article, we`re going to look at five things you probably didn`t know about tracer bullets and how to use them in the U.S. military. First, tracer cartridges help soldiers illuminate exactly where they are shooting.

Depending on who you ask, trackers are either an invaluable tool for soldiers or a dangerous burden.

Until the technology is fully updated, the above issues will still exist.

But hey, they definitely look cool in the photos!

Most civilians probably think that tracer projectiles are the only type of ammunition a soldier would fire in the dark. After all, they can see where they meet,

which is almost impossible from a small valley in the dark, right? In standard NATO munitions (including the United States),

it is usually a mixture of strontium compounds (nitrate, peroxide, etc.) and a metallic fuel such as magnesium.

The result is a bright red light. Russian and Chinese tracer munitions create a green light with barium salts.

Another use of the tracer is in armored-hulled machine guns, mostly from obsolete tanks,

where the machine gun driver cannot see directly along the gun, so he must rely on tracer bullets to direct his target.

However, modern battle tanks and armored fighting vehicles use advanced fire control systems

that can accurately target secondary weapons with the main armament.

although the continued use of tracers gives shooters security against machine gun fire.

Second, the use of tracer projectiles during a low-light exchange of fire is that they project the

idea that your squad has overwhelming firepower in the hope that the enemy will give up the fight for another day.

This is not the main reason for the use of tracer projectiles,

but if necessary, the escape of machine gun tracer projectiles would certainly

give the enemy a pause to reconsider his intentions. Damn, in Afghanistan, you can even make the enemy believe that

Allah is raining down hellfire for his evil deeds.

Probably not, but you never know. Some trackers

are called “cushioning” or “dark” and are explicitly designed for use with night vision devices

5 things to know about 5.56 tracer rounds:

1) A Tracer Glows When Shot

Tracer Rounds machine gun
Machine gun tracer rounds illuminate the sky during an attack by militants in the Pesh Valley in Afghanistan’s Kunar Province. (Photo by Tim Wimborne/Reuters)

Britannica says the following about them:

“Tracer bullets have a column of pyrotechnic

composition in the base that is ignited by the flame of the propellant; this provides a visible pyrotechnic

display during the bullet’s flight.”

Easy enough, right? Courtesy of the above explanation, we know why a tracer glows when shot.

But what is the ultimate purpose of using tracer rounds during a firefight?

Firstly, tracer rounds help soldiers illuminate where exactly they are firing.

Secondly, using tracer rounds during a lowlight firefight is that they project the idea that your force

has overwhelming firepower in hopes the enemy gives up to fight another day.

This isn’t the main reason for using tracer rounds,

but in a pinch, seeing tracer rounds exiting machine guns would certainly give the enemy pause to rethink their intentions. Heck, in Afghanistan you may even make the enemy believe that Allah is raining down fire from Hell for their wicked deeds.

Probably not, but you never know…

However, when it comes to tracer rounds’ downsides their ability to illuminate can be a double-edged sword.

 

Tracer rounds give up one’s position much more easily than regular rounds. Because a typical tracer round glows so bright,

an enemy can better lock in troops’ position during firefights simply by tracing the tracer rounds back to their origin.

If the origin is a tank, it isn’t quite as big of a deal since a tank is well-armored.

If, nevertheless, the origin of the shot was an individual soldier’s rifle,

then giving away one’s position could have dire consequences. This leads us to the next point.

2) Tracer Rounds Are Used Sparingly

Most civilians probably picture tracer rounds as the only type of round that a soldier would fire in the dark.

After all, it allows them to see where they’re hitting, which is all but impossible from across a small valley in the dark, right?

However, because of the tracer rounds’ uncanny ability to give away one’s position, they are used sparingly.

Tracer rounds are actually only loaded every four-five rounds in a magazine.

Marines from 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, fire M240G medium machine guns at fixed targets in Djibouti. (Photo by Cpl. Jonathan R. Waldman/U.S. Marine Corps)

Another item to consider when firing tracer rounds is the environment in which one is operating.

For example, a barren desert with no trees doesn’t scream “fire risk,”

while terrain like the hills and woodlands of California can’t seem to stop catching on fire.

When using them, troops have to ensure that there won’t also be unintended consequences like lighting the entire hillside

on fire and then trap themselves without a good escape route.

Firing 10,000 tracer rounds into a dry California forest isn’t a good idea, however, you look at it.

These are obviously somewhat unlikely events, but ones to consider nonetheless.

But this isn’t the only reason tracer rounds are used sparingly during war.

 

3) Tracer Rounds Aren’t All That Accurate

The biggest thing most people probably just don’t know about tracer rounds is that they just aren’t all that accurate.

Pic of the Day: Tracer Rounds

Read Next: Pic of the Day: Tracer Rounds

Consider this: every time you fire your weapon the projectile exits the barrel and flies towards the intended target.

Then, consider that the projectile changes weight by 50 percent (for example) in mid-flight prior to connecting with the target.

The rounds contain a pyrotechnic feature as part of their build.

When the pyrotechnic burns itself up and extinguishes, the weight of the round changes significantly.

The mid-flight weight change is usually enough to ensure the round doesn’t greet its mark as intended.

The outcome of this is simply that if you shoot three normal rounds and then a tracer round,

the tracer round will not impact the same area the normal rounds do

. Obviously, this is only magnified as distance increases.

So, the reason why they glow is also why they are inaccurate.

 

4. there Isn’t Only One Type of Tracer Round

Air Force joint terminal attack controller call-for-fire training tracer rounds
A U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controller marks a target with tracer rounds during a call-for-fire training event at an undisclosed location in Afghanistan in support of Resolute Support, March 6, 2020. ORS is a NATO-led train, advise, and assist mission seeking reconciliation and peace for Afghanistan. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Joel Pfiester/USAF)

One of the least known facts about tracer rounds is that they aren’t one-size-fits-all in their design. While they all serve a similar purpose, specific tracers are designed for different uses. Consider the analogy of hammers. A sledgehammer, regular hammer, and ball-peen hammer all have similar functions (driving one material into another). You would be unwise, however, to use a sledgehammer to hammer in a 10-penny nail. You’d be using the right type of tool (hammer) but the wrong variant for the job. It is much the same way with tracer rounds.

Currently, there are three types of traditional tracer rounds.

These types include bright, subdued, and dim. Gotta love the military and its ability to dumb things down for people.

The website ammoravine.com breaks it down perfectly for us here:

  • Bright — These tracers burn immediately when fired after leaving the muzzle of the weapon.
  • Subdued — These tracers begin to burn at full brightness usually after traveling at least 100 yards in order to help protect the shooters’ position.
  • Dim — Just as the name indicates, these types of tracers burn dimly but can easily be picked up by night vision optics.

A bright tracer round is what most people think of when they hear of tracers.

This specific round provides the most illumination of a target area,

but it also gives away the shooter’s position more than the other two types.

To equate it to my career in Law Enforcement, I’ll explain it like this:

Let’s consider that I’m clearing a house because it is suspected that a burglar is hiding somewhere inside.

Because a police officer (who isn’t on the SWAT team) doesn’t have access to night vision goggles,

he/she is forced to use a flashlight to clear the home.

The flashlight is necessary for you to see the burglar hiding in a corner or under a bed; you’d be lost without that flashlight.

The flashlight, however, is also what the burglar is going to shoot at if he so decided to take that chance because

he/she knows that the officer is holding that light. So the burglar will, on occasion,

spray-and-pray in the area of the flashlight.

Because of that inherent risk, good officers will hold their flashlight away from their body

(when appropriate) to ensure that if someone does spray bullets in their

direction the bullets hit their hand/arm rather than their forehead.

Choosing a specific type of tracer round is an important consideration

and it is also why many soldiers don’t like using tracer rounds

ADVERTISEMENT

The final item we’ll discuss today is the overall legality of tracer rounds for the general public.

 

5) Tracer Round Legality

15th Marine Expeditionary Unit desert survival and tactics course
Gunnery Sgt. Dragos Coca, from the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, engages targets during a desert survival and tactics course. (Photo by Sgt. Steve H. Lopez/USMC)

Because tracer rounds are combustible,

the federal government isn’t thrilled to make them widely available to the general public as a shooting aid (shocker).

In fact, the Feds have put tracer rounds firmly in the category of “explosive materials”

and therefore the ATF restricts every aspect of owning them, including their purchase, sale, storage, and transportation (again, a shocker).

I do see where the Feds are coming from, though,

because the single thing that has never failed to

shock me while being a Marine or a cop is the absolute incompetence and general stupidity of many.

Many would, no doubt,

buy a case of tracer rounds and carry them in the front seat of a pickup truck while smoking a cigarette.

So, while I hate federal government overreach on anything, some people are just plain dumb and they ruin it for the rest of us.

Short of Uncle Hank getting an explosives license through the ATF,

we don’t have to worry about a highway fireworks show because of the significant regulation of these rounds…

and I guess that’s good.

There is also the chance that your particular state has passed laws regulating the rounds.

As we’ve seen some of the uber-liberal states illegally (in my opinion)

restrict certain types of ammunition or certain magazine capacities,

some states also feel it necessary to regulate tracer rounds beyond the way the federal government already restricts them.

I’m not going to go into this, because states vary so dramatically in gun and ammunition laws,

but it is safe to say that if you have any desire to use tracer rounds as a civilian
you might want to look into both Federal and state (and even local) laws to ensure you are fully compliant with each.

You don’t want to miss one line of the legal code

and have an overzealous young agent want to make a name for himself off of your arrest. Let’s stay away from that.

Depending on who you ask, tracers are either an invaluable tool for soldiers or a dangerous burden.

Until the technology has been fully updated, the problems highlighted above will always exist.

But hey, they sure do look cool in photos!

5.56 tracer rounds composition:

PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
Product Name: TRACER ROUNDS
Chemical Name: Mixture – Metal Alloy
Synonyms: Caliber .50 Tracer M17, Cartridge 7.62 Tracer M62, Cartridge 5.56 MM Tracer M196, 5.56 MM M856
Tracer Round
Chemical Family: Metal mixture
Formula: Not applicable – mixture
Product Use/ Description: Loaded Round
COMPANY ADDRESS MSDS Control Group
Olin Corporation – Winchester
Division, Inc.
600 Powder Mill Road
East Alton, IL 62024
www.winchester.com
TECHNICAL
INFORMATION:
618-258-3507
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE
NUMBER:
618-258-2111
2. COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
CAS Number Components % By Weight EINECS/ ELINCS # EU Classification
Symbol R-Phrase
7440-50-8 Copper 25 – 65 231-159-6 None None
7440-66-6 Zinc 1 – 35 231-175-3 F (as dust or
powder)
R 15-17
7439-92-1 Lead 7 – 20 231-100-4 T, N* R1-33-50/53-62
7439-89-6 Iron 0.1 – 15 231-096-4 None None
10042-76-9 Strontium nitrate 0.1 – 2 233-131-9 None None
1314-18-7 Strontium
peroxide
0.1 – 5 215-224-6 None None
7439-95-4 Magnesium 0.1 – 1 231-104-6 None None
7440-36-0 Antimony 0.1 – 5 231-146-5 None None
9004-70-0 Nitrocellulose 5 – 15 Not listed E* R 2
55-63-0 Nitroglycerin 1 – 5 200-240-8 E, T+, N R 3-26/27/28-33-
51-53
84-74-2 Dibutyl phthalate 0.5 – 5 201-55-74 None None
15245-44-0 Normal Lead
styphnate
0.1 – 1 239-290-0 E, T, N R61-3-20/22-33-
50/53-62
*This material is not listed in Annex 1 of Directive 88/379/EEC. Olin has classified the material according to the conventional method based
upon information from similar materials.
OSHA REGULATORY STATUS: Explosive
3. HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
CAUTION!
EXPLOSIVE. KEEP AWAY FROM HEAT. DO NOT SUBJECT TO MECHANICAL SHOCK. PARTICLES FROM FIRING MAY BE
HARMFUL IF INHALED. DO NOT TAKE INTERNALLY.
HAZARD RATINGS (for dust or fume) Degree of hazard (0 = low, 4 = extreme)
Hazardous Materials Identification System (HMIS) Health: 0 Flammability: 0 Physical Hazard:
Explosive: 2
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Mixture. Not rated.
Page 2 of 6
MSDS No.: 00058.0001

HUMAN THRESHOLD RESPONSE DATA
Odor Threshold: Unknown
Irritation Threshold: Unknown
Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) Value(s): The IDLH for this product is not known. The IDLH for dibutyl phthalate
is 4000 mg/m3
. The IDLH for copper and lead is 100 mg/m3
. The IDLH
for nitroglycerin is 75 mg/m3
. The IDLH for antimony is 50 mg/m3
.
POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS
This product is composed of a finished metal alloy cartridge which contains the various components completely sealed within.
Therefore, under normal handling of this product, no exposure to any harmful materials will occur.
When the ammunition is fired, a small amount of particles may be generated which may be slightly irritating to the eyes and the
respiratory tract. The particles may contain trace amounts of these harmful substances:
Copper: Inhalation of high concentrations of metallic copper dusts or fumes may cause nasal irritation and/or nausea, vomiting and
stomach pain.
Nitroglycerin: Will produce dilation of blood vessels and drop in blood pressure which may affect the heart. It has also been shown to
cause methemoglobinemia (cyanosis).
Lead: Ingestion of large amounts of lead can cause abdominal pain, constipation, cramps, nausea and/or vomiting. Chronic
exposure to lead can cause kidney damage, anemia, reproductive effects, developmental effects and permanent nervous system
damage in humans including changes in cognitive function.
It is unlikely that the amount of particles that someone would be exposed to from firing a loaded round would be sufficient to cause
any of these effects.
MEDICAL CONDITIONS AGGRAVATED BY EXPOSURE: There are no medical conditions known to be aggravated by exposure to
this product in its solid form. Exposure to lead can aggravate anemia, cardiovascular and respiratory disease.
POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS: Product has not been tested for environmental properties. Lead has been shown
to be toxic to aquatic species.
4. FIRST AID MEASURES
EYE CONTACT: Immediately flush out fume or particles with large amounts of water for at least 15 minutes, occasionally lifting
the upper and lower eyelids. If eye irritation develops, call a physician at once.
SKIN CONTACT: Wash skin with plenty of soap and water.
INHALATION: If symptoms of lung irritation occur (coughing, wheezing or breathing difficulty), remove from exposure area to
fresh air immediately. If breathing has stopped, perform artificial respiration. Keep affected person warm and at
rest. Get medical attention.
INGESTION: If ingested, immediately call a physician.
5. FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
PROPERTY VALUE PROPERTY VALUE
Explosive Yes Flammable Not applicable
Combustible Not applicable Pyrophoric No
Flash Point (°C): Not applicable Burning Rate of Material: Not applicable
Lower Explosive Limit: Not applicable Autoignition Temp.: No data
Upper Explosive Limit: Not applicable Flammability Classification: (defined by 29 CFR 1910.1200) Explosive
UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS: If fire reaches cargo, do not fight. Evacuate all person, including emergency
responders from the area for 1500 feet (1/3 mile) in all directions.
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA: Flood area with water. If no water is available, carbon dioxide, dry chemical or
earth may be used. If the fire reaches the cargo, withdraw and let fire burn.
SPECIAL FIREFIGHTING PROCEDURES: In case of fire, use normal fire fighting equipment. Protection concerns must also
address the potential of the physical characteristic of this product as explosive.
Page 3 of 6
MSDS No.: 00058.0001

6. ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

FOR ALL TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENTS, CALL CHEMTREC AT 800-424-9300.
Spills of this material should be handled carefully. Do not subject materials to mechanical shock. A spill of this material will normally
not require emergency response team capabilities. If, however, a large spill occurs, call 1-888-289-1911 for technical assistance.
7. HANDLING AND STORAGE
HANDLING: Cartridge may detonate if case is punctured or severely damaged.
STORAGE: No special requirements
Shelf Life Limitations: Not known
Incompatible Materials for Packaging: None known
Incompatible Materials for Storage or Transport: Acids, Class A & B explosives, strong oxidizers, and caustics
CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Mechanical impact or shock and electrical discharge. Cartridges placed in a high
radio frequency energy field (radar stations).
8. EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION
CAS # CHEMICAL NAME ACGIH TLV OSHA PEL INTERNATIONAL OELS
7440-50-8 Copper 0.2 mg/m3
(fume), 1
mg/m3
(dusts and
mists)
0.1 mg/m3
(fume)
1 mg/m3
(dusts
and mists)
Austria, Belgium, Canada: 0.2 mg/m3
(fumes), 1
mg/m3
(dusts)
Denmark: 1.0 mg/m3
(dust and powder)
Germany (MAK): 0.1 mg/m3
(fume), 1 mg/m3
(dusts and mists)
7440-66-6 Zinc None established None established None established
9004-70-0 Nitrocellulose None established None established None established
55-63-0 Nitroglycerin 0.05 ppm (0.46
mg/m3
)
Skin
Ceiling – 0.2 ppm
(2 mg/m3
)
Skin
Denmark: 0.02 ppm (0.2 mg/m3
)
Norway, Sweden: 0.03 ppm (0.3 mg/m3
)
Austria, Belgium, Germany, The Netherlands,
Poland, Switzerland: 0.05 ppm (0.47 mg/m3
), skin
Finland, France: 0.1 ppm (0.9 mg/m3
), skin
U.K.: 0.2 ppm (2 mg/m3
), skin
84-74-2 Dibutyl phthalate 5 mg/m3 5 mg/m3
Belgium, Denmark, France, Netherlands,
Switzerland, U.K.: 5 mg/m3
Sweden: 3 mg/m3
7439-92-1 Lead 0.05 mg/m3
0.05 mg/m3
Austria, Denmark, Germany, Sweden,
Switzerland: 0.1 mg/m3
Norway, Poland: 0.05 mg/m3
7439-89-6 Iron None established None established None established
10042-76-9 Strontium nitrate None established None established None established
1314-18-7 Strontium peroxide None established None established None established
7439-95-4 Magnesium None established None established None established
7440-36-0 Antimony 0.5 mg/m3 0.5 mg/m3 Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Finland,
Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Norway,
Poland, Sweden, UK: 0.5 mg/m3
15245-44-0 Lead styphnate None established None established None established
ENGINEERING CONTROLS: Local exhaust ventilation is recommended if significant dusting occurs or fumes are generated.
Otherwise, use general exhaust ventilation. Use hearing protection.
EYE / FACE PROTECTION: Use safety glasses.
SKIN PROTECTION: Not normally needed
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Respiratory protection not normally needed.
GENERAL HYGIENE: Do not eat, drink, or smoke while using this product. Wash hands thoroughly after use.
9. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
PROPERTY VALUE PROPERTY VALUE
Appearance: Finished cartridge Vapor Density (air = 1): Not applicable
Odor: None Boiling Point (°F): Not applicable
Molecular Weight: Not applicable – Mixture Melting point: Not applicable
Page 4 of 6
MSDS No.: 00058.0001

PROPERTY VALUE PROPERTY VALUE
Physical State: Solid Specific gravity (g/cc): Not applicable
pH: Not applicable Bulk Density Not applicable
Vapor Pressure (mm Hg): Not applicable Viscosity (cps): Not applicable
Vapor Density Not applicable Decomposition Temperature: Not applicable
Solubility in Water (20 °C): Insoluble Evaporation Rate: Not applicable
Volatiles, Percent by volume: Not applicable Octanol/water partition coefficient: Not applicable
10. STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
STABILITY: Stable under normal temperatures and pressure.
MATERIALS TO AVOID: Acids, Class A & B explosives, strong oxidizers, and caustics
HAZARDOUS DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS: Nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, lead oxides, carbon dioxide, lead
dust/fume
HAZARDOUS POLYMERIZATION: Will not occur.
OTHER: Cartridge may detonate if case is punctured or severely damaged.
11. TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
POTENTIAL EXPOSURE ROUTES:

The physical nature of this product makes absorption from any route unlikely. A small amount of
inhalable particles may be created when projectile is fired.
ACUTE ANIMAL TOXICITY DATA:
For Product: For Components
Copper Lead Lead
styphnate
Nitrocell
-ulose
Iron Nitroglycerin
Magnesium
Zinc Strontium
nitrate
Strontium
peroxide
Dibutyl
phthalate
Antimony
Oral LD50 Not
applicable
for product
No data No data No data > 5 g/kg
(rat)
30 g/kg
(rat)
> 2 g/kg
(rat)
No data No data 2.75
g/kg
(rat)
No data 8 g/kg
(rat)
7 g/kg
(rat)
Dermal
LD50
Not
applicable
for product
No data No data No data No data No data > 2 g/kg
(rabbit)
No data No data No data No data > 20
ml/kg
(rabbit)
No data
Inhalation
LC50
Not
applicable
for
product.
Particles
generated
from firing
may be
slightly
toxic.
> 1000
mg/m3
(4 hr,
rat)
No data No data No data No data > 5 mg/l
(4
hours,
rat)
No data No data No data No data 4250
mg/m3
(rat)
No data
Irritation Not a skin
or eye
irritant as a
loaded
round.
Mild eye
and skin
irritant
Not
irritating
No data No data Eye
irritant
Mild eye
and skin
irritant
No data Eye
irritant
Severe
skin
irritant,
mild eye
irritant
Severe
eye and
skin
irritant
No data No data
SUBCHRONIC/ CHRONIC TOXICITY: Lead has caused blood, kidney and nervous system damage in laboratory
animals. Strontium peroxide has produced effects in laboratory animals on the
lungs, heart, kidneys and skeletal muscles from inhalation and ingestion.
CARCINOGENICITY: The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) lists lead as possibly
carcinogenic to humans, group 2B.
MUTAGENICITY: This product is not known or reported to be mutagenic. Lead has been shown to
be mutagenic in several in vitro assays.
REPRODUCTIVE, TERATOGENICITY, OR
DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS:
This product is not known or reported to cause reproductive or developmental
effects. Dibutyl phthalate has caused reproductive and developmental effects in
animal studies. Lead has been shown to affect fetal development including birth
defects and reduce male reproductive function in laboratory animals.
NEUROLOGICAL EFFECTS: This product is not known or reported to cause neurological effects. Lead has
caused peripheral and central nervous system damage and behavioral effects in
laboratory animals.
INTERACTIONS WITH OTHER CHEMICALS
WHICH ENHANCE TOXICITY: None known or reported.
Page 5 of 6
MSDS No.: 00058.0001

12. ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
ECOTOXICITY: No data is available on this product. Individual constituents are as follows:
Copper: The toxicity of copper to aquatic organisms varies significantly not only with the species, but also with the
physical and chemical characteristics of the water, such as its temperature, hardness, turbidity and carbon dioxide
content. Copper concentration varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mg/l have been found by various investigators to be not toxic
for most fish. However, concentrations of 0.015 to 3.0 mg/l have been reported as toxic, particularly in soft water to
many kinds of fish, crustacea, mollusks, insects, and plankton.
Nitrocellulose: LC50 > 1000 mg/l (fish, invertebrates, algae)
Nitroglycerin: Bluegill, 96 hour LC50 = 1.228 mg/l (static)
Lead: LC 50 (48 hrs.) to bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) is reported to be 2-5 mg/l. Lead is toxic to waterfowl.
Zinc: The following concentrations of zinc have been reported as lethal to fish:
Rainbow trout fingerlings: 0.13 mg/l, 12 – 24 hours
Bluegill sunfish: 6 hr TLM = 1.9 – 3.6 mg/l (soft water, 30°C)
Rainbow trout: 4 mg/l (hard water) 3 days
Sticklebacks: 1 mg/l (soft water) 24 hrs
The presence of copper appears to have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of zinc towards fish.
MOBILITY: Dissolved lead from degraded bullets may migrate through soil.
PERSISTANCE/DEGRADABILITY: Not biodegradable. Bullets may fragment and decompose in soil leading to accumulation of lead.
BIOACCUMULATION: No data
13. DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
Care must be taken to prevent environmental contamination from the use of this material. The user of this material has the
responsibility to dispose of unused material, residues and containers in compliance with all relevant local, state and federal laws and
regulations regarding treatment, storage and disposal for hazardous and nonhazardous wastes.
14. TRANSPORT INFORMATION
U.S. DOT RID/ADR IMDG IATA IMO Canada TDG
PROPER SHIPPING NAME: Cartridges for weapons, inert projectile
HAZARD CLASS: 1.4 C
UN NO.: UN 0339,
PACKING GROUP: II
HAZARD LABEL/PLACARD: 1.4 C Cargo Aircraft/1.4 Placard over 1001 lbs. (454 kg)
REPORTABLE QUANTITY: Not applicable
SPECIAL COMMENTS: Cargo aircraft 75 kg max per package
The material described above is subject to the U.S. Dot Hazardous Materials Regulations if packaged
in non-bulk packaging and shipped by rail, motor, water or air.
15. REGULATORY INFORMATION
US FEDERAL
TSCA The components of this product are listed on the Toxic Substance Control Act inventory.
CERCLA: Copper, R.Q.= 5000 lbs.; Zinc, R.Q. = 1000 lbs.; Nitroglycerin, R.Q. = 10 lbs.; Dibutyl phthalate, R.Q. =
10 lbs.; Lead, R.Q. = 10 lbs.; Antimony, R.Q. = 5000 lbs. (No reporting is required if diameter of the
pieces of metal is equal to or exceeds 100 micrometers (0.004 inches).
SARA 313: Copper, Zinc (fume or dust), Nitroglycerin, Dibutyl phthalate, Lead, Antimony
SARA 313 Hazard Class: Health: Acute – No
Chronic – No
Fire: No Reactivity: None Release of Pressure: Yes
SARA 302 EHS List: None of the components of this product are listed. *
RQ = Reportable Quantity
STATE RIGHT-TO-KNOW STATUS
Component *CA Prop. 65 New Jersey Pennsylvania Massachusetts Michigan
Copper Not listed X X X X
Zinc Not listed X Not listed X X
Page 6 of 6
MSDS No.: 00058.0001

Component *CA Prop. 65 New Jersey Pennsylvania Massachusetts Michigan
Nitrocellulose Not listed X X X Not listed
Nitroglycerin Not listed X X X Not listed
Dibutyl phthalate Not listed X X X X
Lead X X X X X
Iron Not listed Not listed Not listed Not listed Not listed
Strontium nitrate Not listed Not listed X X Not listed
Strontium peroxide Not listed Not listed X X Not listed
Magnesium Not listed Not listed X Not listed Not listed
Antimony Not listed X X X X
Lead styphnate X Not listed Not listed X Not listed
* “WARNING: This product contains detectable amounts of a chemical(s) known to the State of California to cause cancer and/or birth defects or other
reproductive harm.”
EUROPEAN REGULATIONS
Hazard Classification
Danger Symbol: E Explosive
Risk Phrases: R2 Risk of explosion by shock, friction, fire or other sources of ignition
Safety Phrases: S2 Keep out of reach of children.
German WGK Classification: Not known
CANADIAN REGULATIONS
DSL LIST: The components of this product are on the DSL or are exempt from reporting under the New Substances Notification
Regulations.
IDL: Copper, Dibutyl phthalate, Antimony, Lead
WHMIS: This product is not subject to WHMIS. It is regulated as a Class 6 Explosive in Canada.

11 reviews for Buy 5.56 Tracer Rounds | At Best Price

  1. Vanammo

    I buy tracer rounds quite often and I don’t have a “explosives license”

  2. Vanammo

    Hud, we’re trying to let readers know what the laws on the books say; If you have tracers, you should know what the laws are so you know the potential risks of ownership. I’m not saying the ATF will knock on your door but based on how the laws are written, they could. That risk, no matter how small, may mitigate any benefits to having the tracers in the first place. That’s an individual risk/reward calculation as far as I’m concerned.

  3. Vanammo

    I think the tracers that you need a license for is the (INCINDINARY) rounds. There are a lot of non-incindinary rounds that you can buy.

  4. Vanammo

    You can mail order tracers like any other ammo.

  5. Vanammo

    I can also buy cocaine on some street corners, that doesn’t make it legal.

  6. Vanammo

    I recently purchased some .308 tracer rounds with a red tip and when I put a magnet to them there’s a strong attraction. They came linked with standard ball ammo and they’re all made by the same manufacturer. They are Israeli surplus from 1974 with brass casing and copper fmj. Why would they be magnetic? I’ve never heard of a tracer with a steel core before…

  7. Vanammo

    FTA would make my butt illegal if they could. Sometimes it seems like a lethal weapon.

  8. Vanammo

    I have friends with backsides that have been declared weapons of mass destruction.

  9. Vanammo

    Could I have 22 caliber rounds shipped to my residence?

  10. Vanammo

    Hi Charles, it depends mostly on where you live. We ship to most states but there are certain cities (Chicago, Washington, D.C.) that we cannot ship to due to local laws.

  11. Vanammo

    This article is wrong. I’m an FFL and there are zero permits or license requirements to purchase, possess or use tracer ammunition. The writer correctly notes some municipalities ban them due to a fire risk. The ATF regulates tracer ammo as much as they regulate tannerite, which means they don’t.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Stay Connected

[mc4wp_form id="447"]

[mc4wp_form id="447"]

Courses

Company Info

Get in touch

EMAIL: Sales@ammovalleydepot.com

TEL: +1(601) 493-9799

LOCATION: 6306 Fox Ridge Dr, Plainfield, IL 60586, United States

AMMOVALLEYDEPOT© 2022. All rights reserved.

You cannot copy content of this page